Rails Test Prescriptions Blog

Keeping Your Application Healthy Since 2008

June 7, 2010: Lot of Conferences Week Begins

Today is the RailsConf tutorial day, with the conference proper starting tomorrow. I was less disappointed than I thought I would be when my talks were not accepted, but I’m more disappointed than I thought I would be not to be going. Have fun, everybody.

On the other side of the country, today is the Apple WWDC keynote, which I’m sure I’ll join the rest of the internet in obsessing over.

Book Status

Over the weekend, worked on the style chapter of the book, largely trying to incorporate the ideas from the Chicago Ruby talk, and also combining some of the short chapters. Need to find out if I have a page limit.

Lots Of Links

Plasma Rails is a new Rails RDoc presentation site that claims to update Rails 3 docs nightly. It’s got a very TextMate-ish dark theme.

The Everyday Rails site has a quick rundown of three Rails Authentication methods, Restful Authentication, Authlogic, and Devise. Devise looks nice, and I’m considering moving the Rails Test Prescription examples to it since it seems to be an easier setup than Authlogic and also Rails 3 compatible.

Not to be outdone, I Suck At Ruby mentions a feature of the the Ruby TextMate bundle that validates Ruby code on save.

Josh Owens at RailsFreak has a suitably quick post with thoughts on how to do a quick launch of a web application.

DHH himself has released Tolk, which is a Rails engine providing a web interface to support translators entering text and converting it to the Rails YAML locale files. I think this was extracted from the recent Basecamp multiple language release, looks like it’d be useful.

Ars Technica named the winners of their design awards. I concur on two of the three apps that I use (Tweetie — please finish the Mac version 2.0 — and Dropbox), I like 1Password, but wouldn’t consider the app itself to have a particularly great design. Don’t use the others, although Soulver is pretty cool.

Finally, In Self Promotion

This has been around for a while, I think, but it just passed back in front of my eyes. Antonio Cangiano has a list of recommended Ruby books, and a separate list of Rails books.

Somewhat flattered to have my Wrox book, Professional Ruby on Rails, be included. There are parts of that book that I think are really great. And parts of it that were obsolete almost the moment it was printed (for instance the entire chapter on using Subversion with Rails…). Anyway, thanks!

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